← Nathanael Silverman

A collection of thoughts from one human being

A Beginner's Guide to Morning Routines

Every morning I wake up at 6 am. By the time I leave for work, around 9, I've meditated, stretched, exercised, consulted the weather, assessed my mood and state of mind, gone over my schedule, picked out a list of tasks for the day, gone through my email, read the news, watered my plants, showered, and groomed.

Depending on the day I may have worked out more, strengthened my voice with some vocal exercises, or written either in a paper journal or on this very blog, as I'm doing now.

This wasn't always the case. My snooze button could tell you as much. For a long time my morning routine consisted of sleep, sleep, drowsily convince self doesn't need to attend that 9 am class, sleep some more... shower and dress as fast as possible, head out.

It's not that I didn't aspire to do things with my free time. But I couldn't bring myself to do it in the morning, and once freed from school, or work, I was often too tired to do much of anything. I felt like I was wasting my time.

I want to share 3 ideas that helped me break through.

Humans Require Daily Maintenance

It started with some shoulder pain. I'm a software engineer, I spend a lot of time sitting in front of computers, often with a bad posture. And so, I started experiencing shoulder pain, especially towards the end of the work day.

In looking for solutions I realized that I was going to need to stretch and do some simple exercises every single day, probably for the rest of my life. It dawned on me that there were many things that humans need to repeat every day to stay healthy and sane.

It's a notion I had previously rejected. Chores were chores, and I wanted to spend as little time doing them as possible. Sure, I had to sleep. And eat. And clean, I guess. But the 14 leftover hours were all about freedom and exploration. I wanted to do new things and reach milestones every day. I was wrong.

I use my body and mind all day long, and so do you. It's a complex machine. It works best with daily tune-ups. And yes, they are incredibly repetitive. But they're also, without a doubt, the best use of my time. I am happier and more productive than ever.

Slow Progress Is Sustainable Progress

The bad news is, this isn't a miracle solution. I don't have a "morning routine" pill to sell you. Building a routine takes patience and dedication.

The good news is it doesn't require bursts of painful effort either. Your best bet is to start small. Pick one thing you'd like to do every morning. Something that only takes a few minutes. Maybe you'd like to meditate. Maybe you'd like to drink water and eat a fruit. Whatever it is, figure out how much time it requires, and set your alarm clock to wake you up earlier by that amount of time.

You may not be able to wake up at 6 am, yet, but I bet you can wake up 5 minutes earlier than you normally do without too much effort.

Do that small thing for a few weeks. You might be eager to reach certain goals, but understand that the path to success is one of slow, incremental progress. Don't pressure yourself. If you try to do too much at once you'll deplete your willpower and give up.

Once you've become comfortable and confident in your ability to do that small task every morning, add another one to your routine. You can see where I'm going with this. Repeat this process until you have the routine you want. Soon you'll be amazed at the results you get from doing simple, small things consistently.

You Can't Break a Flexible Routine

My routine is always evolving. I think about what I could add or remove. I experiment. For a while I would pick my tasks for the day as the first thing. By the time I got to the meditation part of my routine my mind was already buzzing with thoughts about what and how I would do these tasks. Now I meditate before anything else.

Think of your routine as being flexible and adaptable. Over time your needs will change. This is true of long term goals and priorities, it is also true from one day to the next. For example, I stretch every morning. I have 2 lists of stretches. One is very thorough, the other one is shorter and eliminates some of the harder stretches. Depending on my energy level I might do one or the other.

Finally, be kind to yourself. Some days you may need to skip parts of your routine. Perhaps you need to recuperate sleep, or you really don't feel like it. That's OK. Give yourself a break and adapt your routine to what you're able to do that day.

Epilogue

Nowadays I couldn't imagine not having a morning routine. My habits are ingrained and the benefits obvious. Give it a try. You'll never look back.

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