The Engagement Responsibility

I grew up in France. I went to school there, where I developed a keen sense of criticism. One of my recurring complaints was this: We had textbooks, yet teachers made us transcribe their own paraphrased version of all the lessons. There I was, spending hours a day copying information I already had.

Over the years I became less and less motivated. At one time an allegedly bright student, my grades started to deteriorate. Eventually I was described as a slacker.

Now, teachers dedicate their lives to education. They’re meant to help us discover and reach our potential. We rely on them to produce well-adjusted, happy adults. We give them about 20 years of our lives… But for all that responsibility the only advice they ever gave me was “work harder.”

See, I thought being a teacher meant being responsible for teaching. They thought it meant dispensing information. Whether us students learned the material was of little concern.

Here’s the thing, “teachers:” If we don’t learn, you haven’t taught.

But I suppose I did learn something, albeit outside of the curriculum. Me, you, students, all people… We do our best work when we’re engaged. If you’re any kind of leader, a manager, a teacher… own that fact! Give your people the right to be engaged. When they’re not, see what you can change.

Schools Should Teach Posture

Fact: you are very likely to experience a back problem at some point in your life. One-half of all working Americans admit to having back pain symptoms each year. Tens of billions of dollars are spent on it.1

But did you know that some indigenous populations have never heard of, much less felt, back pain? That’s right. And studying their posture suggests we’re doing it all wrong. Or so The Gokhale Method argues—quite convincingly—while offering its own recommendations.

This is where schools come in. A 2007 study found that 38% of school children already had poor posture.[2] Is it any surprise? There we sit for years and hour on end. On cheap chairs. Bored out of our minds. It’s a god damn recipe for hunched backs…

But the epidemic could just as easily be reversed through awareness and simple exercises. Thanks for the history lesson teach, now can I learn to sit and stand?

1. Back Pain Facts & Statistics from the American Chiropractic Association
2. Kratenová J, Zejglicová K, Malý M, Filipová V. Prevalence and risk factors of poor posture in school children in the Czech Republic. J Sch Health. 2007 Mar; 77(3): 131-7.